Episode #92: What Does Net Neutrality Mean For Musicians?

Episode #92: What Does Net Neutrality Mean For Musicians?

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The internet is a vital tool for artists, but without the protections that ensure a level playing field, creators’ ability to earn a living comes under threat. On today’s episode, we dive into the murky waters of net neutrality, copyright, and tech giants. We hear from Thirsty Ear Recordings Peter Gordon about why musicians should care about net neutrality. This point is echoed by Evan Greer of Fight for the Future, who goes on to explain the organization’s controversial stance on copyright. Finally, Deerhoof’s Greg Saunier shares his opinion on tech giants like Google and why musicians are so mad at YouTube.

Episode #91: Liner Notes In The Digital Age

Episode #91: Liner Notes In The Digital Age

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What if there were an IMDB for music? Not only would fans be able to dig deeper into their favorite albums, but producers, artists, and other collaborators could catalog their contributions, labels could track data more easily, and businesses would have all of the information they need to license a song right at their fingertips. On this episode, we talk with a new service called Jaxsta. CEO Jacqui Louez Schoorl and Head of Licensing Dick Huey discuss how Jaxsta could revolutionize music data use and its accessibility. Then, we talk with one of our favorite music databases and marketplaces, Discogs. Chief Product Officer Nik Kinloch demonstrates how music fans and record collectors can take advantage of Discogs’ music database (plus we hear about some new features!).

Episode #64: 2016’s Impact on the Music Industry

Episode #64: 2016’s Impact on the Music Industry

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Last year, we released 37 episodes on a wide variety of topics in music. From rights to royalties, we covered subjects important to artists and those who support them. On this episode, we look back at the major issues we reported on in 2016 and those who they impacted most. We hear from musician Melissa Ferrick about the Spotify lawsuits that started the year, then A2IM’s Richard Burgess gives us the scoop on the Digital Millennium Copyright Act and how it’s creating problems for the industry. David Israelite of the NMPA clearly breaks down how the Department of Justice has handled the consent decrees and what that means for creators.

Episode #48: Artists Weigh In

Episode #48: Artists Weigh In

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We’ve brought you expertise from businesspeople, gatekeepers and analysts, and today we’re highlighting a few of the many savvy artists we’ve had on the show. On this episode, musicians give their take on some of the most important music industry issues of the last year. First, artist and lawyer Christiane Kinney examines the recent Spotify lawsuits, then we hear from plaintiff David Lowery, who gives us his take on royalty reporting. Celebrated musician and songwriter Laura Veirs takes us on her career journey, and Valerie Day (Nu Shooz) emphasizes the importance of the Fair Play, Fair Pay Act.

Episode #38: Take Down, Stay Down: Revisiting the DMCA

Episode #38: Take Down, Stay Down: Revisiting the DMCA

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What do artists like Katy Perry, Debbie Harry, Lionel Richie and hundreds of others have against one piece of legislation? Along with many in the creative community, they’re calling for reform of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. The DMCA was drafted in 1998 — before platforms like Napster and YouTube existed — with the intent of bringing copyright up to date with the digital age. Unfortunately, according to those calling for reform, the outdated act has allowed tech giants to profit from copyright infringement while artists’ own earnings plummet. On this episode, we dissect the issue and discuss solutions with Richard Burgess, CEO of A2IM, RIAA’s Senior Executive Vice President Mitch Glazier, Perry Resnick of Music Managers Forum, and musician and lawyer John Strohm.

Episode #30: Spotify’s Unpaid Royalties

Episode #30: Spotify’s Unpaid Royalties

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Could two multi-million dollar lawsuits be the downfall of one of music’s most popular streaming services? Earlier this year, two class-actions were brought against streaming giant Spotify by musicians David Lowery and Melissa Ferrick. The plaintiffs allege that Spotify knowingly distributes copyrighted material without obtaining the proper licenses. So what do these suits mean for musicians and the industry as a whole? We discuss with lead plaintiff Melissa Ferrick, lawyers Howell O’Rear and Chris Castle, and musician and music lawyer Christiane Kinney.