Episode #65: What Trump’s Presidency Means for Music

Episode #65: What Trump’s Presidency Means for Music

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A presidency doesn’t usually hold so many unknowns for the music community, but the election of Donald Trump will affect a range of issues important to musicians and music industry professionals. On this episode of The Future of What, we have a frank discussion about how Trump’s presidency could influence issues like healthcare, net neutrality, free expression and more. We’re joined by Kevin Erickson of The Future of Music Coalition, an organization that specializes in education, advocacy and research on behalf of musicians. We also talk with Jon Coombs, who’s behind the ‘Our First 100 Days’ project with Secretly Group. Finally, Jana Hunter of Lower Dens speaks candidly about the Affordable Care Act and making music in difficult times.

Episode #64: 2016’s Impact on the Music Industry

Episode #64: 2016’s Impact on the Music Industry

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Last year, we released 37 episodes on a wide variety of topics in music. From rights to royalties, we covered subjects important to artists and those who support them. On this episode, we look back at the major issues we reported on in 2016 and those who they impacted most. We hear from musician Melissa Ferrick about the Spotify lawsuits that started the year, then A2IM’s Richard Burgess gives us the scoop on the Digital Millennium Copyright Act and how it’s creating problems for the industry. David Israelite of the NMPA clearly breaks down how the Department of Justice has handled the consent decrees and what that means for creators.

Episode #50: Songwriters’ Rights

Episode #50: Songwriters’ Rights

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Think the music industry is confusing? Here’s where things get really hairy for songwriters. The Department of Justice recently issued a statement upholding consent decrees that regulate performing rights organizations BMI and ASCAP. These decrees were originally intended as an antitrust measure, but many feel they are outdated and come with many costs. David Israelite, CEO of the NMPA, says this decision will devalue songs, implicate the property rights of songwriters and limit their creative process. We asked musician and industry critic David Lowery (Cracker, Camper Van Beethoven) and lawyer Chris Castle to help us further understand the ramifications of the DOJ’s stance.

Episode #48: Artists Weigh In

Episode #48: Artists Weigh In

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We’ve brought you expertise from businesspeople, gatekeepers and analysts, and today we’re highlighting a few of the many savvy artists we’ve had on the show. On this episode, musicians give their take on some of the most important music industry issues of the last year. First, artist and lawyer Christiane Kinney examines the recent Spotify lawsuits, then we hear from plaintiff David Lowery, who gives us his take on royalty reporting. Celebrated musician and songwriter Laura Veirs takes us on her career journey, and Valerie Day (Nu Shooz) emphasizes the importance of the Fair Play, Fair Pay Act.

Episode #38: Take Down, Stay Down: Revisiting the DMCA

Episode #38: Take Down, Stay Down: Revisiting the DMCA

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What do artists like Katy Perry, Debbie Harry, Lionel Richie and hundreds of others have against one piece of legislation? Along with many in the creative community, they’re calling for reform of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. The DMCA was drafted in 1998 — before platforms like Napster and YouTube existed — with the intent of bringing copyright up to date with the digital age. Unfortunately, according to those calling for reform, the outdated act has allowed tech giants to profit from copyright infringement while artists’ own earnings plummet. On this episode, we dissect the issue and discuss solutions with Richard Burgess, CEO of A2IM, RIAA’s Senior Executive Vice President Mitch Glazier, Perry Resnick of Music Managers Forum, and musician and lawyer John Strohm.

Episode #19: Grammys In My District

Episode #19: Grammys In My District

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When people hear about the Recording Academy, some scratch their heads in wonder, while others immediately recognize them as the organization that puts on the Grammy Awards every year. However, both of these responses bely the true effort and intent behind the organization, as they are just as involved in awards shows as they are in advocacy for musicians on Capitol Hill and beyond. After several successful years of doing the music industry lobbying day, “Grammys On The Hill,” the Recording Academy decided to take the model that they had developed for Washington, D.C. and bring that back to musician’s home districts. This year represents the second time that “Grammys In My District” has happened, and we speak with three different players inside the organization about what’s different about this year’s event, and catch some soundbytes of the event that took place in Seattle on October 14.